Why are nipples naughty?

If male nipples are no big deal, then what makes female nipples that’s so titillating?

weirdvintage:

Lady Florence Norman, a suffragette, rides her motor-scooter to work, 1916 (via)

weirdvintage:

Lady Florence Norman, a suffragette, rides her motor-scooter to work, 1916 (via)

(via weirdvintage)

Gender behind the barista counter to celebrate National Coffee Day.

Since it first began its westward expansion in the 16th century, coffee has been a distinctively male drink. Even today, while plenty of women work behind the coffee counter, many wonder whether a bro-rista culture continues to dominate the rapidly expanding specialty coffee industry.

7 Queens Who Fought to Rule
From Boudica to Lili’oukalani, these queens were royal female forces to be reckoned with.
(pictures above: Empress Wu, Nzinga, Eleanor of Aquitane)

7 Queens Who Fought to Rule

From Boudica to Lili’oukalani, these queens were royal female forces to be reckoned with.

(pictures above: Empress Wu, Nzinga, Eleanor of Aquitane)

youngblackandvegan:

theladybadass:

Rare footage of educator and civil rights leader, Mary McLeod Bethune (circa 1930s, 1940s)

*found in Prelinger Open Archives

beautiful

If you don’t know who Mary McLeod Bethune is, we talk about her and other women of color you should know in “Black Women Striving for Suffrage.”

(via blackgirlflymag)

Gov. Brown signed the bill over the weekend, effectively making active sexual consent legally mandatory on college campuses.

15th-century Hair Removal

Even in the Early Renaissance, excessive body hair was something of a feminine abomination. Back then, it was associated with being unsanitary, brutish and symptomatic of imbalanced humors (which isn’t a far cry from the gendered logic behind today’s feminine depilatory standards, minus the humors on the fritz). A 1532 book of beauty recipes notes that proper ladies “will need a depilatory that cleanly removes the unsightly hairs in various places on a woman’s body,” which could be achieved with a mixture of cat dung and vinegar. Imbalanced humors, indeed!…

15th-century Hair Removal

Even in the Early Renaissance, excessive body hair was something of a feminine abomination. Back then, it was associated with being unsanitary, brutish and symptomatic of imbalanced humors (which isn’t a far cry from the gendered logic behind today’s feminine depilatory standards, minus the humors on the fritz). A 1532 book of beauty recipes notes that proper ladies “will need a depilatory that cleanly removes the unsightly hairs in various places on a woman’s body,” which could be achieved with a mixture of cat dung and vinegar. Imbalanced humors, indeed!…

5 Fat Truths About Cankles

Why slender ankles are perhaps the most arbitrary beauty standard of the 20th century.

Vulva Cupcakes: The Only Dessert Gallery a Lady Needs