newsweek:

The state of women in technology: 15 data points you should know - TechRepublic
Here are 15 important data points you should know, including a few rays of sunlight.
1. Women made up 26% of the computing workforce in 2013 That’s according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology’s most recent statistics. They also broke down the numbers even more:
3% of computing workforce were black women 5% were Asian women 2% were Hispanic women 2. Professional women earn 73 cents to the dollar vs. men According to Narrow the Gapp, that’s $333 of a weekly paycheck, which adds up to $17,316 per year. The site also says that women who work in computer and mathematical occupations make 84 cents to every dollar a man earns. That’s $214 out of her weekly paycheck. Compare that to the overall national average of women earning 80 cents to every dollar a man earns.
3. In the mid-1980s, 37% of computer science majors were women; in 2012, 18% In a study Google released last month, the company surveyed about 1,600 men and women. It showed that girls aren’t really taught what computer science actually means, and are half as likely to be encouraged to study it. The words females unassociated with computer science used to describe it were “boring,” “technology,” and “difficult.”
4. 57% of bachelor’s degrees earned by women, 12% of computer science degrees Much of this has to do with exposure to computer science before college and during college. According to Code.org, nine out of ten schools don’t even offer computer science classes, and in 28 out of 50 states, computer science doesn’t count towards a math or science credit.
5. Google’s workforce is only 30% female The company released this information back in May, along with its leadership stats: 79% male. And this isn’t just a Google problem — the same goes for Yahoo, who employs 37% women, Facebook, which is 31%, and LinkedIn, which employs 39%.
But, Google has since made strides to tackle the issue. It announced it will invest $50 million in programs to get girls more interested in STEM education and coding with a “Made With Code” campaign. Some of the money will go to Girls Who Code and Black Girls Code, The company is also working with Girl Scouts of America and female celebrities to spark girls’ interests in computer science.

newsweek:

The state of women in technology: 15 data points you should know - TechRepublic

Here are 15 important data points you should know, including a few rays of sunlight.

1. Women made up 26% of the computing workforce in 2013
That’s according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology’s most recent statistics. They also broke down the numbers even more:

3% of computing workforce were black women
5% were Asian women
2% were Hispanic women
2. Professional women earn 73 cents to the dollar vs. men
According to Narrow the Gapp, that’s $333 of a weekly paycheck, which adds up to $17,316 per year. The site also says that women who work in computer and mathematical occupations make 84 cents to every dollar a man earns. That’s $214 out of her weekly paycheck. Compare that to the overall national average of women earning 80 cents to every dollar a man earns.

3. In the mid-1980s, 37% of computer science majors were women; in 2012, 18%
In a study Google released last month, the company surveyed about 1,600 men and women. It showed that girls aren’t really taught what computer science actually means, and are half as likely to be encouraged to study it. The words females unassociated with computer science used to describe it were “boring,” “technology,” and “difficult.”

4. 57% of bachelor’s degrees earned by women, 12% of computer science degrees
Much of this has to do with exposure to computer science before college and during college. According to Code.org, nine out of ten schools don’t even offer computer science classes, and in 28 out of 50 states, computer science doesn’t count towards a math or science credit.

5. Google’s workforce is only 30% female
The company released this information back in May, along with its leadership stats: 79% male. And this isn’t just a Google problem — the same goes for Yahoo, who employs 37% women, Facebook, which is 31%, and LinkedIn, which employs 39%.

But, Google has since made strides to tackle the issue. It announced it will invest $50 million in programs to get girls more interested in STEM education and coding with a “Made With Code” campaign. Some of the money will go to Girls Who Code and Black Girls Code, The company is also working with Girl Scouts of America and female celebrities to spark girls’ interests in computer science.

That’s not Photoshop. Those are really flowers in space.

An Illustrated History of Tennis Fashion

During the Victorian era when women took up the sport, their corsets, bustles and dresses were so restrictive,  the daintier-by-necessity ladies’ game was nicknamed “pat ball.” By the 1890s, white was the go-to color on the court since it best concealed perspiration, and in 1905, Mary Sutton Bundy ushered in the 20th century by daring to reveal her wrists on the court. Scandalous!

Illustrations by Erin Dreis.

jtotheizzoe:

superseventies:

Redken Science & Beauty II - 1975 book cover

I’m pretty sure that hair is a safety violation.

well that’s one way to represent women + stem…

jtotheizzoe:

superseventies:

Redken Science & Beauty II - 1975 book cover

I’m pretty sure that hair is a safety violation.

well that’s one way to represent women + stem…

(Source: dtxmcclain, via asapscience)

asapscience:

slowartday:

Flowerscapes by Sophie Tarca

The Earth is pretty frickin’ beautiful, right? 

beauty break

Why Women’s Clothing Sizes Are SO Confusing

Or: why shopping for jeans is a NIGHTMARE. 

19th-century map of a woman’s heart 
(via Brainpickings)

Happy birthday to Louise Bethune, America’s first female architect who designed, among other buildings, the Lafayette Hotel, completed in 1904.

More badass women born in July here.

instagram:

Inspiring Change and an End to Child Marriage with @stephsinclairpix

To learn more about the stories behind the pictures, follow @stephsinclairpix and @tooyoungtowed on Instagram. To see how you can get involved, visit the Girl Summit website.

“She looked at me with tears in her eyes and spoke quietly, ‘In my whole life, I have never felt love.’ I continued to hear similar stories as I traveled, researching and photographing child marriage in countries like Nepal, Ethiopia, India and Yemen, Tanzania, South Sudan and even Europe and the US,” says photographer Stephanie Sinclair (@stephsinclairpix), who has spent more than a decade documenting the abuse of women and girls around the world.

Stephanie’s long-term photography project, Too Young To Wed (@tooyoungtowed), joins the UK’s Department for International Development and UNICEF at the first Girl Summit in London.

"I wanted to make sure that we got these images and stories in front of diplomats and policy makers who could enforce laws and support programs to provide more protection for these girls," she says. "I was sure if the rest of the world understood their lives as I had come to, real change wouldn’t be far behind."